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London based mountaineering and hill-walking club

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 New Arrangements for Membership

In the coming months STMC is planning to make significant changes to its membership arrangements.  For existing members the current system of annual renewals will be discontinued and all existing members will be offered life membership.  New members will be asked to pay a one-off joining fee of £25.  New members will also be asked to complete and sign a membership application form as at present.  After the end of 2013 the Club will no longer maintain its affiliation to the British Mountaineering Council.   Members who want to continue receiving the benefits of BMC membership (insurance, discounts, Summit etc) will be able to join BMC as individual members.

Club activities will continue as at present: meets at roughly one per month, local walks, London socials and Xmas meals, and the main means of communication will be the E-News.

At the moment we have not been through this website to reflect these changes, so please be aware that in future the club will operate as described here.

 

Forthcoming Events

Sept 1 – 3 2017 : Camping, S Wales

Oct 6 – 8
2017 : ox Tor Bunkhouse, Princetown, South Dartmoor Bunkhouse

Oct 27 – 29
2017 : Peak District, Pondside Bunkhouse at Thorpe Farm near Hathersage

Nov 17 – 20 2017 Lake District, Bonscale Farmhouse, 12 places

Jan 19 – 21 2018: North Wales, Oread MC Hut at Rhyd-Ddu

Mar 3 – 10 2018: Scotland Winter Week, area of Spean Bridge

Mar 16 – 18 2018: Yorkshire Dales, Airton Quaker Hostel.

May 19 – 26 2018 : Scotland Spring Meet, Shiel Bridge, Kintail


Please click on 'Meets List' to see more information on the meets.

 
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Home arrow News arrow Meet Reports arrow The Cheviot Hills April 29th May 2nd 2005

The Cheviot Hills April 29th May 2nd 2005

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The Cheviot Hills

April 29th – May 2nd 2005

By Mim Chapman & Clare Gooder

Quality not quantity.  Just four of us on a glorious bank holiday weekend in Northumberland.

We stayed at a campsite near Cottonshopeburnfoot right by the swollen River Rede, just a few yards from Scotland. Miles from any shops we were glad we took the precaution of stocking up with provisions en route (Although myself, Tom and Stephen managed to eat everything on the first night and had to telephone Clare with a shopping list for the following day!). Although there were a few caravans on the campsite it was very pleasant right by the river and - ladies - fabulous shower rooms with radiators …

The Pennine Way   passed through the campsite so it was an easy choice for the Saturday walk.  We walked into the Kielder Forest and out onto the beautiful open land where we could see for miles.  The only person we met all morning was a lady who, we discovered, was walking on her own from Ullapool  to Nice!  We walked on to a Roman fort where we basked in the sun to eat our lunch. Eventually we decided we ought to make a move and as we gasped at the view we calculated that the coast we could see in the distance was about  35 miles away.  We also saw what looked like snow on the Cheviot?

On the Sunday, we drove due north up to Cottonhopehead, thankfully not meeting any tanks or army vehicles in the hill mist, as the single track road passed through several artillery ranges. We parked at Barrowburn and got a bemused look from a passing farmer and his sheep dog as we donned our boots and waterproofs. The weather looked pretty grim up on the Pennine Way, the route we were to take up to The Cheviot at 815 metres, the summit of the Cheviot Hills.  A steep climb upto Windy Gyle on the Pennine Way should have opened up wide vistas, but not today when the heavens opened and it continued to bucket it down!  A testing time came when we were in the middle of an electric storm, and lightening seemed to be striking right by us. Certainly very atmospheric!  This part of the Pennine Way is
well defined  and stone slabs mark the route. However where the path-laying comes to abrupt end,with the helicoptered bags of paving stones waiting to be used, the path becomes a very wet bog!  Cairns are well marked on the map eg. King's Seat, Score Head and Crookedsike Head.  A short detour off the Pennine Way leads up to the Cheviot summit. We were just pondering about the swirling mists being suggestive of the Hounds of the Baskervilles when a dog appeared with his owner who looked very clean and dapper like he'd come out of a Cotswold Outdoor catalogue! unlike our rain bedraggled group.

For poor Tom this was his third time at the summit, all of them in terrible weather. The return was back by the same route but thankfully not with the same weather.  The rain stopped, the mists lifted from the hill tops and the sun came out. When we looked back to where we'd been, the gently-rounded Cheviots appeared very accessible and friendly.  Big views opened up making us realise that Northumberland was a well kept secret, loads of undulating hills, fluffy sheep! a major long distance footpath,the Pennine Way, inaugurated 40 years ago to the day, and vast open spaces all to yourself. The trip so far north was well worth it!

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